-Curator’s Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Barbarian Tropes Framed Anew: Three Qing-dynasty Chinese Lacquer Screens of Europeans Hunting

Dr. Tamara Bentley

Professor Bentley’s talk examines three Chinese incised lacquer folding screens produced between 1665 and 1800. All three screens include segments depicting Europeans hunting exotic animals and parading with gifts; two screens specifically indicate that the Europeans are Dutch. Analysis highlights the ways in which these Chinese screens borrowed “foreigner” imagery from earlier Japanese Nanban screens, and also from earlier paintings of Mongols hunting, and those “barbarian” constructs were even marketed back to Europe.

Tamara H. Bentley is an Associate Professor of Asian Art at Colorado College, where she has been on the faculty since 2001. In her earlier research, she focused on Chinese paintings and prints of the late Ming and early Qing periods. Recently, she has shifted her attention to the international movement of art objects both in and from the East Asian maritime circuits in the early modern period. As part of this larger endeavor, she has been working on Chinese lacquer folding screens, export competition between China and Japan, and the complex layering of cross-cultural contacts in early modern trade.

When: Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 12-1pm

Where: Congdon Board Room, Hamilton Building – Lower Level, Denver Art Museum

Ticket prices in addition to general admission:
AAA Members free
Students / Teachers / Docents $5
DAM members $7
General Public $10

Purchase tickets through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or reserve online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the reservation.

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040 blittle@denverartmuseum.org
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Animate Architecture in the Yucatan Peninsula

Dr. Meghan Rubenstein – Colorado College

When: Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 1:30 pm
Where: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum
Cost: Unless otherwise indicated, lectures are free for students with ID and Alianza members, $5.00 for Denver Art Museum members, and $10.00 for others.
Questions: 720-913-0173
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Speaker: Dr. Britney Kyle – Associate Professor and Anthropology Department Chair at the University of Northern Colorado

The Bioarchaeology of Mediterranean Colonies Project: Interactions at the Greek colony of Himera (Sicily)

Join IPCAS for Dr. Kyle’s presentation about her use of bioarchaeology to study the colony of Himera and the Battle of Himera (409 BCE). Bioarchaeology, the study of human skeletons from archaeological contexts, has been instrumental in uncovering the impacts of social transition on human health and lifestyle in the past. Bioarchaeological methods and interpretive frameworks are used to document and interpret the record of colonial interactions at the Greek colony of Himera (Sicily, Italy). Himera (established in 648 BCE) was one of several Greek colonies on the island of Sicily, and acted as an important stronghold for Greek control of Sicily against neighboring Phoenicians. In 480 BCE, Carthaginians invaded Himera, but the Himerans, with help from Greek allies, defended the city. In 409 BCE Carthaginians returned for revenge. In this battle, no one came to the aid of Himera. Local Himerans attempted to defend their city but were ultimately defeated. This battle marked the abandonment of the city. We’ll explore interactions at the colony of Himera, particularly focusing on information about the Battles of Himera.

When: Thursday, January 18 at 7:00 pm
Where: University of Colorado Museum, Paleontology Hall
Cost: Free and Open to the Public
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Speaker: Ted Hoefer

Title: What Lies In Between

Abstract: Anthropologists and archaeologists have long classified subsistence and settlement systems into categories such as hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, agriculturists and so on. These categories fit well with sites that fall into the average site for each classification, but many sites fall in between. The classification of the sites has often resulted in an awkward analysis and has limited our views on how people lived in the past. Archaeological data simply doesn’t fit for many sites, yet often the site is still analyzed in terms of the assumed subsistence and settlement systems of the geographic area and temporal period.

What lies in between are subsistence and settlement systems that exist on a continuum and are contingent on a variety of factors. For example, an agriculturally based group may become primarily a hunting and gathering group as needs dictate and hunter and gathers may adopt complex gathering and agricultural practices when the need arises. Modeling subsistence and settlement systems that manifest shifting subsidence priorities over space and time is likely to be very productive in data analysis and interpretation.

Recent research at the Meadowlark Terrace site (5AH04) on West Bijou Creek in Arapahoe County as well as other investigations in Colorado will be used to illustrate and examine how researching what lies in between aids our understanding of the past. Preliminary analysis of the 5AH04 data suggests the site is primarily focused on hunting and gathering, yet this Early Ceramic site contains cord-marked sherds indicative of agriculturally based groups further to the east. Analyzing this site as part of an agriculturally based group can only be done by making broad assumptions. However, looking at the site as something in between standard categories may be more fruitful.

Speaker Bio:

Ted Hoefer has been working as an archaeologist since 1979. Most of his work has been conducted in the Intermountain West and Great Plains, but he has also worked in Michigan,
Arkansas, Oregon and Wake Island in Mid-Pacific Ocean. His research interests include Archaic Period settlement and subsistence, modeling of subsistence and settlement systems
and cultural landscapes, and the archaeology of historic mining. Ted is currently employed as Chief Archaeologist by Ecology and Environment, Inc., a national and international environmental consulting firm, in their Boulder, Colorado office.

When: Monday, January 29, 2018, 7:00 PM
Location: VIP Room, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Cost: Free and Open to the Public
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Spencer R. Pelton – PhD student in Anthropology at University of Wyoming

A Thermoregulatory Perspective on Global Human Dispersal

Global human dispersal was in many respects a thermoregulatory endeavor as we left Africa to inhabit world regions with thermal environments to which we had never before been subjected. Humans adopted new thermal technologies to facilitate this dispersal, most importantly clothing and houses, which both enabled human global dispersal and likely fundamentally altered their social life. In this presentation, I draw insights from ethnoarchaeological research of Mongolina Dukha reindeer herders and archaeological research of the Folsom archaeological record to explain the timing and nature global human dispersal. I propose a thermally-informed three-stage model for global modern human dispersal in which humans first occupied those areas in which neither houses nor clothing were needed, then reorganized their social life around the use of climate-controlled houses in northern Eurasia, and finally, having accumulated a suite of complex thermal technologies, rapidly colonized the New World. I ultimately argue that a thermoregulatory framework, although broad in its approach, can help explain human behavioral and material at large scales.

When: Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 7:00 pm
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public
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José Francisco Xavier de Salazar y Mendoza, Spanish Colonial Painter in Louisiana, 1782-1802

Judith H. Bonner – The Historic New Orleans Collection

When: Thursday, February 15, 2018 at 1:30 pm
Where: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum
Cost: Unless otherwise indicated, lectures are free for students with ID and Alianza members, $5.00 for Denver Art Museum members, and $10.00 for others.
Questions: 720-913-0173
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-Curator’s Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Art of the Silk Road and Japan

Patricia J. Graham, PhD

Global trade routes have for millennia not only served as a way for civilizations to reap financial rewards from foreign commerce but have also been essential conduits for domestic innovations, that have led to great cultural and scientific advances for the societies along their routes.

The greatest of the ancient trade routes is the Silk Road that connected the East and West. Japan is widely regarded as its Eastern-most terminus, and the country’s deep and varied engagement with it spans many centuries.

Patricia Graham, PhD; professor, curator and researcher, will explore the various ways contact with the Silk Road enriched the artistic landscape of Japan at various points in time by showing the types of arts reaching Japan via its path and introducing Japanese collectors, researchers, and explorers of Silk Road materials as well as Japanese artists inspired by it from the sixth century to the present.

When: Wednesday, February 21, 2018, 12-1pm

Where: Congdon Board Room, Hamilton Building – Lower Level, Denver Art Museum

Ticket prices in addition to general admission:
AAA Members free
Students / Teachers / Docents $5
DAM members $7
General Public $10

Purchase tickets through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or reserve online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the reservation.

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040 blittle@denverartmuseum.org
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Mesoamerica and New Spain through its Colors: From Olmec Paintings in the Caves of Guerrero to the Genealogy of the Kings of Azcapotzalco in the Codex Garcia Granados

Dr. Gerardo Gutierrez and Dr. Mary Pye – University of Colorado

When: Thursday, March 15, 2018 at 6:30 pm
Where: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum
Cost: Unless otherwise indicated, lectures are free for students with ID and Alianza members, $5.00 for Denver Art Museum members, and $10.00 for others.
Questions: 720-913-0173
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Dr. Linda Scott Cummings – PaleoResearch Institute

TOPIC TBA

When: Thursday, March 22, 2018 at 7:00 pm
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public
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-Curator’s Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Two Masters of Intangible Heritage

Mr. Tianming Wang & Mr. Tao Wang

Intangible Cultural Heritage is defined as traditions or living expression inherited from our ancestors and passed on to our descendants. It includes practices, representations, expressions, knowledge and skills that communities, groups and individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage.

Tao Wang and Tianming Wang are recognized as Masters of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Shandong, China; Tao Wang in the “family business” of papercutting, and Tianming Wang in the carving of extraordinary tiny versions of everyday things.

The two Masters will share their knowledge and works in this Asian Art Association sponsored program.

When: Wednesday, April 6, 2018, 12-1pm

Where: Congdon Board Room, Hamilton Building – Lower Level, Denver Art Museum

Ticket prices in addition to general admission:
AAA Members free
Students / Teachers / Docents $5
DAM members $7
General Public $10

Purchase tickets through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or reserve online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the reservation.

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040 blittle@denverartmuseum.org
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Christian Driver and Katy Waechter – City of Boulder

TOPIC TBA

When: Thursday, April 12, 2018 at 7:00 pm
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public
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Mesoamerica and New Spain through its Colors: From Olmec Paintings in the Caves of Guerrero to the Genealogy of the Kings of Azcapotzalco in the Codex Garcia Granados

Dr. Gerardo Gutierrez and Dr. Mary Pye – University of Colorado

When: Thursday, March 15, 2018 at 6:30 pm
Where: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum
Cost: Unless otherwise indicated, lectures are free for students with ID and Alianza members, $5.00 for Denver Art Museum members, and $10.00 for others.
Questions: 720-913-0173
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The Curious Equestrian Portrait of Viceroy Bernardo de Galvez

Dr. Raymond Hernandez Duran – University of New Mexico

When: Thursday, April 19, 2018 at 6:30 pm
Where: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum
Cost: Unless otherwise indicated, lectures are free for students with ID and Alianza members, $5.00 for Denver Art Museum members, and $10.00 for others.
Questions: 720-913-0173
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Kelton Meyer – Colorado State University

TOPIC TBA

When: Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 7:00 pm
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

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