September 17, 2016: Dr. Tammy Stone, University of Colorado Denver

Point of Pines Pueblo

 

Abstract

Point of Pines Pueblo, located in the mountains of central Arizona, is an 800 room pueblo occupied from 1265-1400 AD  occupied by people ancestral to modern day Zuñi peoples.  For 35 years of its occupation (1265-1300) an enclave of people from the Kayenta region to the north (ancestral to modern day Hopi) were present at the site.  The nature of the relationship between these two groups, before, during and after the presents of the enclave at the site is the topic of the talk.

Bio

Tammy Stone, Ph.D., R.P.A. is a Professor of Anthropology and Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Colorado Denver (UCD).  She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology with a specialty in Archaeology from Arizona State University and her certification from the Register of Professional Archaeologist prior to coming to UCD.  Stone has a distinguished record of teaching, research, and service and has served in numerous leadership positions on her campus including chairing Anthropology, as well as two departments that were placed in academic receivership by the college and as acting dean.  Stone’s academic background is concentrated in archaeology, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of factionalism and alliance formation in communities in Southwestern Pueblos with a secondary interest in Higher Education Administration.  She has published 4 books and  more than 25 articles and book chapters.  

Education

R.P.A., Registered Professional Archaeologist (1999)

Ph.D., Arizona State University (1992)

M.A., Univeristy of Texas (1984)

B.A., Florida State University (1981)

Selected Publications

Books

– Stone, Tammy (2015) Migration and Ethnicity in Middle Range Societies: a View from the Southwest.  University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

– Stone, Tammy and Mary Coussons-Read (2011) Leading from the Middle: a Case-Study Approach to Academic Leadership for Associate Deans.  American Council on Education series, Rowman and Littlefield.

Stone, Tammy (1999) The Prehistory of Colorado and Adjacent States.  University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

 

 Some recent articles:

– Stone, Tammy (in press) Kayenta House Variability.  In Social Networks in the American Southwest, edited by Karen Harry and Barbara Roth.  University of Colorado, Boulder.

– Stone, Tammy (2016) Organizational Variability in Early Aggregated Communities in Middle-Range Societies: an Example from the Kayenta Region of the American Southwest. American Antiquity 81:58-73

– Stone, Tammy 2014  Integrating the Concept of Diverse Interest Groups into the Undergraduate Curriculum in Archaeology.  SAA Archaeological Record 14(1):36-39.

– Gilman, Patricia A. and Tammy Stone (2013) The Role of Ritual Variability in Social Negotiations of Early Communities: Great Kiva Homogeneity and Heterogeneity in the Mogollon Region of the North American Southwest. American Antiquity 78:607-623.

– Stone, Tammy (2013) Kayenta Ritual Structures from A.D. 1100-1300.  Kiva 78:177-206.

– Stone, Tammy and William Lipe (2011) Standing Out vs. Blending in: Pueblo Migrations and Ethnic Marking. In Changing Histories, Landscapes, and Perspectives: The 20thAnniversary Southwest Symposium, edited by Margaret Nelson, pp. 277-298.  University of Colorado, Niowt.

– Stone, Tammy, Kathleen Bollard and Jon Harbor (2009) Launching Interdisciplinary Programs as Signature Areas: a Case Study from the University of Colorado Denver. Innovative Higher Education 34(5): 321-329.

– Stone, Tammy (2009) Room Function and Room Suites in late Mogollon Pueblo Sites. Kiva 75: 63-86.

– Stone, Tammy (2009) Departments in Academic Receivership: Possible Causes and Solutions.  Innovative Higher Education 33(4):229-238

– Stone, Tammy (2008) Social Innovation and Transformation during the Process of Aggregation.  In Cultural Transformation and Archaeology: Issues and Case Studies, edited by Michael O’Brien and Todd VanPool, pp. 158-163.   Society for American Archaeology, Washington, D.C.

– Stone, Tammy (2005) Factional Formation and Community Dynamics in Middle-Range Societies. In Nonlinear Modeling for Archaeology and Anthropology: Continuing the Revolution, edited by W. Baden and C. Beekman, pp. 79-93.  Ashgate Press, London.

– Stone, Tammy (2005) Late Period Pithouses in the Point of Pines Region of Arizona.  Kiva70:273-292.

– Stone, Tammy (2003) Social “Islands” in the Denver Basin.  In Islands in the Plains: Select Areas of the Archaeological Landscape, edited by Marcel Kornfeld, pp. 245-257. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

– Stone, Tammy (2003) Classic Period Hohokam Exchange in Social Context.  In Centuries of Decline: the Hohokam Classic period at Pueblo Grande, edited by David R. Abbott, pp. 128-147.  University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

– Stone, Tammy (2003) Social Identity and Ethnic Interaction in the Western Pueblos of the American Southwest.  Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 10:31-67.

Courses Taught

Introduction to Archaeology (ANTH 1302)

Culture and the Human Experience (Introduction to Cultural Anthropology) (ANTH 2102)

World Prehistory (ANTH 3301)

Southwestern Archaeology (ANTH 3320)

Quantitative Methods in Anthropology (ANTH 4050/5053)

Archaeological Lab Methods (ANTH 4390)

Lithic Analysis (ANTH 4330/5330)

Contemporary Perspectives in American Archaeology (ANTH 6307)

Archaeological Research Design and Analysis (ANTH 6317)

September 17, 2016: Dr. Tammy Stone, University of Colorado Denver

Point of Pines Pueblo

Abstract

Point of Pines Pueblo, located in the mountains of central Arizona, is an 800 room pueblo occupied from 1265-1400 AD  occupied by people ancestral to modern day Zuñi peoples.  For 35 years of its occupation (1265-1300) an enclave of people from the Kayenta region to the north (ancestral to modern day Hopi) were present at the site.  The nature of the relationship between these two groups, before, during and after the presents of the enclave at the site is the topic of the talk.

Bio

Tammy Stone, Ph.D., R.P.A. is a Professor of Anthropology and Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Colorado Denver (UCD).  She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology with a specialty in Archaeology from Arizona State University and her certification from the Register of Professional Archaeologist prior to coming to UCD.  Stone has a distinguished record of teaching, research, and service and has served in numerous leadership positions on her campus including chairing Anthropology, as well as two departments that were placed in academic receivership by the college and as acting dean.  Stone’s academic background is concentrated in archaeology, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of factionalism and alliance formation in communities in Southwestern Pueblos with a secondary interest in Higher Education Administration.  She has published 4 books and  more than 25 articles and book chapters.  

Education

R.P.A., Registered Professional Archaeologist (1999)

Ph.D., Arizona State University (1992)

M.A., Univeristy of Texas (1984)

B.A., Florida State University (1981)

Selected Publications

Books

– Stone, Tammy (2015) Migration and Ethnicity in Middle Range Societies: a View from the Southwest.  University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

– Stone, Tammy and Mary Coussons-Read (2011) Leading from the Middle: a Case-Study Approach to Academic Leadership for Associate Deans.  American Council on Education series, Rowman and Littlefield.

Stone, Tammy (1999) The Prehistory of Colorado and Adjacent States.  University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

 

 Some recent articles:

– Stone, Tammy (in press) Kayenta House Variability.  In Social Networks in the American Southwest, edited by Karen Harry and Barbara Roth.  University of Colorado, Boulder.

– Stone, Tammy (2016) Organizational Variability in Early Aggregated Communities in Middle-Range Societies: an Example from the Kayenta Region of the American Southwest. American Antiquity 81:58-73

– Stone, Tammy 2014  Integrating the Concept of Diverse Interest Groups into the Undergraduate Curriculum in Archaeology.  SAA Archaeological Record 14(1):36-39.

– Gilman, Patricia A. and Tammy Stone (2013) The Role of Ritual Variability in Social Negotiations of Early Communities: Great Kiva Homogeneity and Heterogeneity in the Mogollon Region of the North American Southwest. American Antiquity 78:607-623.

– Stone, Tammy (2013) Kayenta Ritual Structures from A.D. 1100-1300.  Kiva 78:177-206.

– Stone, Tammy and William Lipe (2011) Standing Out vs. Blending in: Pueblo Migrations and Ethnic Marking. In Changing Histories, Landscapes, and Perspectives: The 20thAnniversary Southwest Symposium, edited by Margaret Nelson, pp. 277-298.  University of Colorado, Niowt.

– Stone, Tammy, Kathleen Bollard and Jon Harbor (2009) Launching Interdisciplinary Programs as Signature Areas: a Case Study from the University of Colorado Denver. Innovative Higher Education 34(5): 321-329.

– Stone, Tammy (2009) Room Function and Room Suites in late Mogollon Pueblo Sites. Kiva 75: 63-86.

– Stone, Tammy (2009) Departments in Academic Receivership: Possible Causes and Solutions.  Innovative Higher Education 33(4):229-238

– Stone, Tammy (2008) Social Innovation and Transformation during the Process of Aggregation.  In Cultural Transformation and Archaeology: Issues and Case Studies, edited by Michael O’Brien and Todd VanPool, pp. 158-163.   Society for American Archaeology, Washington, D.C.

– Stone, Tammy (2005) Factional Formation and Community Dynamics in Middle-Range Societies. In Nonlinear Modeling for Archaeology and Anthropology: Continuing the Revolution, edited by W. Baden and C. Beekman, pp. 79-93.  Ashgate Press, London.

– Stone, Tammy (2005) Late Period Pithouses in the Point of Pines Region of Arizona.  Kiva70:273-292.

– Stone, Tammy (2003) Social “Islands” in the Denver Basin.  In Islands in the Plains: Select Areas of the Archaeological Landscape, edited by Marcel Kornfeld, pp. 245-257. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

– Stone, Tammy (2003) Classic Period Hohokam Exchange in Social Context.  In Centuries of Decline: the Hohokam Classic period at Pueblo Grande, edited by David R. Abbott, pp. 128-147.  University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

– Stone, Tammy (2003) Social Identity and Ethnic Interaction in the Western Pueblos of the American Southwest.  Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 10:31-67.

Courses Taught

Introduction to Archaeology (ANTH 1302)

Culture and the Human Experience (Introduction to Cultural Anthropology) (ANTH 2102)

World Prehistory (ANTH 3301)

Southwestern Archaeology (ANTH 3320)

Quantitative Methods in Anthropology (ANTH 4050/5053)

Archaeological Lab Methods (ANTH 4390)

Lithic Analysis (ANTH 4330/5330)

Contemporary Perspectives in American Archaeology (ANTH 6307)

Archaeological Research Design and Analysis (ANTH 6317)

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